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The Australian National University

Dr Stephen Munro

Position: Visiting Fellow

School or Centre: School of Archaeology & Anthropology

Email: stephen.munro@nma.gov.au

Dr Stephen Munro

Contact information: Stephen.munro@nma.gov.au

Biography

Stephen completed his PhD ‘Molluscs as ecological indicators in palaeoanthropological contexts’, at the School of Archaeology and Anthropology in 2010. He has worked as a curator at the National Museum of Australia since 2008. In 2013 he attended the conference ‘Human Evolution Past, Present & Future – Anthropological, Medical & Nutritional Considerations’, in London, as an invited speaker along with Sir David Attenborough and Dr. Donald Johanson.

Research interests:

The origin and evolution of apes
The origins and evolution of the genus Homo
The palaeoecology of hominid evolution
The ‘Littoral Dispersal Model’ of human evolution
‘Aquarboreal Model’ of ape evolution
The origin of human speech
History of ideas concerning human evolution (including savanna and aquatic ape theories)
Representations of human evolution in the popular media
The peopling of Australia

Key Publications

Verhaegen, M.; Puech, P.F.; Munro, S. (2002) Aquarboreal Ancestors? Trends in Ecology & Evolution 17: 212–217.

Munro, S., Broadhurst, C.L., Crawford, M. & Verhaegen, M. (2007) Crossing Wallace’s Line: A palaeoanthropological puzzle solved? Homo – Journal of Comparative Human Biology 58: 258.

Verhaegen, M., Munro, S., Vaneechoutte, M., Bender, R. & Oser, N. (2007) The original econiche of the genus Homo: Open Plain or Waterside? In Muñoz, S. (ed.) Ecology Research Progress. Nova: New York, pp. 155–186.

Wynn, J.G., Roman, D.C., Alemseged, Z., Reed, D., Geraads, D., & Munro, S. (2008) Stratigraphy, depositional environments and basin structure of the Hadar and Busidima Formations at Dikika, Ethiopia. In: Quade, J. & Wynn, J.G. (eds) The Geological Context of Human Evolution in the Horn of Africa. Geological Society of America Special Publication, pp. 87-118.

Broadhurst, C.L., Crawford, M. & Munro, S. (2011) Littoral man and waterside woman: The crucial role of marine and lacustrine foods and environmental resources in the origin, migration and dominance of Homo sapiens. In Vaneechoutte, M., Kuliukas, A. & Verhaegen, M. (eds) Was Man more aquatic in the past? Fifty years after Alister Hardy: Waterside hypotheses of human evolution. Bentham Science Publishers: eBook, pp. 16-35.

Verhaegen, M. & Munro, S. Puech, P.F. and Vaneechoutte, M. (2011) Early hominoids: Orthograde aquarboreals in flooded forests? In Vaneechoutte, M., Kuliukas, A. & Verhaegen, M. (eds) Was Man more aquatic in the past? Fifty years after Alister Hardy: Waterside hypotheses of human evolution. Bentham Science Publishers: eBook, pp. 67-81.

Munro, S. & Verhaegen, M. (2011) Pachyosteosclerosis in Archaic Homo: heavy skulls for diving, heavy legs for wading? In Vaneechoutte, M., Kuliukas, A. & Verhaegen, M. (eds) Was Man more aquatic in the past? Fifty years after Alister Hardy: Waterside hypotheses of human evolution. Bentham Science Publishers: eBook, pp. 82-105.

Vaneechoutte, M., Munro, S. & Verhaegen, M. (2011) Seafood, diving, song and speech. In Vaneechoutte, M., Kuliukas, A. & Verhaegen, M. (eds) Was Man more aquatic in the past? Fifty years after Alister Hardy: Waterside hypotheses of human evolution. Bentham Science Publishers: eBook, pp. 181-189.

Verhaegen, M. & Munro, S. (2011) Pachyosteosclerosis suggests archaic Homo frequently collected sessile littoral foods? Journal of Comparative Human Biology 62: 237–247.

Vaneechoutte, M., Munro, S. Verhaegen, M. (2012) Reply to John Langdon’s review of the eBook: Was Man more aquatic in the past? Fifty years after Alister Hardy. Waterside hypotheses of human evolution, Mario Vaneechoutte, Algis Kuliukas and Marc Verhaegen (Eds.). Bentham eBooks (2011). Journal of Comparative Human Biology 63: 496-503.

Munro, S. (2013) Endurance Running Versus Underwater Foraging: An Anatomical and Palaeoecological Perspective. Human Evolution 28: 201–212.

Joordens, J., d’Errico, F., Wesselingh, F., Munro, S. et al. (2015) Homo erectus at Trinil used shells for tool production and engraving. Nature 518: 228-231.

 

See also

Humans - built for long-distance running? ABC Science show with Robyn Williams and Daniel Lieberman (29 March 2008):

http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/scienceshow/humans---built-for-long-distance-running/3294034#transcript

Human history rewritten by ancient engravings. Science show with Robyn Williams (6 December 2014):

http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/scienceshow/human-history-rewritten-by-ancient-engravings/5947852

 

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